Why Reading Is Not a Natural Process

Updated: Feb 11, 2019

Nearly four decades of scientific research on how children learn to read supports an emphasis on phoneme awareness and phonics in a literature-rich environment. These findings challenge the belief that children learn to read naturally.

If you are looking for information on how students learn how to read, this article Why Reading Is Not a Natural Process from ASCD by G. Reid Lyon is worth a read. The article covers the following topics:

  • The Critical Role of Phonemic Awareness

  • Developing Automaticity and Understanding

  • Linguistic Gymnastics

  • Why Some Children Have Difficulties Learning to Read

That direct instruction in alphabetic coding facilitates early reading acquisition is one of the most well established conclusions in all of behavioral science. . . . The idea that learning to read is just like learning to speak is accepted by no responsible linguist, psychologist, or cognitive scientist in the research community (Stanovich 1994).

Putting Research Into Action

Substantial evidence shows that many children in the 1st and 2nd grades and beyond will require explicit instruction to develop the necessary phoneme awareness, phonics, spelling, and reading comprehension skills

Students need for explicit instruction is a driving focus behind The Indy Learning Team programs and trainings. Every child deserves the opportunity which comes from access to literacy.